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Frequently Asked Questions


Q: WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CONDITIONAL DISCHARGE AND SUPERVISION?

A: The difference primarily is in the impact each disposition will have on your record. Conditional discharge means that a conviction has been entered. Supervision means that if you meet the terms and conditions of your sentence, the judge will terminate the case without entering a judgment of conviction. Supervisions are easier to expunge from your record. They are reserved for individuals with good backgrounds.

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Q: WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE ON THE COURT’S SUPERVISION?

A: If you are placed on a period of supervision, conditional discharge, or probation that means you are not serving a sentence of jail, but you are being monitored by the judicial system. You will be required to meet certain conditions for a period.  The most important condition is that you not get arrested for any new offense. You might also have to pay a fine, do community service, not have contact with an individual or business, seek employment, or abide by a curfew. Failure to abide by these conditions will be a violation of the terms of the sentence, and a violation could be filed against you.

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Q: WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO HAVE A VIOLATION OF SUPERVISION OR PROBATION FILED AGAINST YOU?

A: If a violation has been filed against you it means the State is alleging you have not abided by the terms of the sentence, and it wants additional penalties assessed against you. The level of proof needed in a criminal trial is proof beyond a reasonable doubt. But then the level of proof needed for the State to win a violation hearing is only preponderance of the evidence. If the State wins the violation hearing, the Judge will likely impose some jail time or turn supervision into a conviction.

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